Decentering Authority: A Public Oral History Workshop

Lots of oral history and narrative-related events in NYC lately. Post courtesy of Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics

DECENTERING AUTHORITY: BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE ORAL HISTORY OF MIXED-HERITAGE FAMILIES IN BROOKLYN (AND GETTING COMFORTABLE TALKING ABOUT RACE)

WHO: Sady Sullivan is Director of Oral History at Brooklyn Historical Society where she manages new oral history projects as well as preservation of BHS's oral history collections dating back to 1973.  In addition, Sady works with curators and educators at BHS to produce audio for exhibitions, walking tours, and K-12 curricula.  Her work is influenced by the Buddhist practice of deep listening, and formative experiences at two feminist institutions: The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies and Babeland.  Sady has radio experience, both pre- and post- podcast era, and Chuck D once said she did a good job on the 1s and 2s. Sady received an MA in Cultural Reporting & Criticism from NYU and a BA in Psychology and Women's Studies from Wellesley College.

WHEN: Thursday, March 27, 2014, 6:00pm - 8:00pm.

WHERE: 509 Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd St.

ABOUT: Crossing Borders, Bridging Generations (cbbg.brooklynhistory.org) is an oral history project exploring the history and experiences of mixed-heritage people and families. Through sharing stories, we open up intergenerational conversations about preserving cultural heritage in a multicultural democracy. These conversations historicize our understanding of concepts like race, ethnicity, and nationality.  Inspired by feminist methodology and participatory action research, CBBG is designed to be responsive to the concentric conversations happening among narrators, interviewers, archivists, and the public programming audience, as well as resonating scholarship, activism, and media. Sady Sullivan will share the strengths and challenges of CBBG's experimental project design and the pleasures of hosting forums where people practice talking about race/ethnicity (and intersecting identities) together.

This event is free and open to the public and is part of the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series.